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  Spirulina Green Food Algae Information - Nutritional Guide

Spirulina helps the body to detox in a natural way and helps reduce cholesterol.

Spirulina is a single cell type of algae that thrives in warm alkaline fresh water. Spirulina is one of the most natural, clean foods that can be found in nature. It is the highest source of natural Beta-Carotene, Vitamin D and GLA (Gamma Linolenic Acid). Spirulina contains all nine essential Amino Acids. It is extremely high in natural protein, much higher than beef.

Spirulina is a food that has extremely long shelf life. It contains 26 times the calcium of milk and has a good supply of niacin and phosphorus. It is of great help to almost any kind of ailment known to mankind. It helps build the blood, gives energy, and strengthens cells and tissue. Spirulina helps balance blood sugar and satisfies hunger.

Spirulina balances RNA/DNA, it helps the brain function and gives better mental clarity. Energy is noticed in a few short days as well as a keen alertness. Spirulina is a complete protein, contains the complete Complex vitamins and the essential Trace Minerals and Fatty Acids.

Spirulina helps the body to detox in a natural way and eventually will rid the body of toxic poisons. It helps the body with mineral absorption and helps reduce cholesterol.

The name Spirulina is derived from the word Helix, meaning a normal spiral of Electric Charge. This is interpreted to mean - to help correct the body polarity. This along with Bee Pollen make the greatest boon to the puzzle of why do some people seem to always be sick or shopping for a doctor to help them with their chronic fatigue, depression. anxiety, nervousness, sleeplessness, hypochondria and many other problems. They go from doctor to doctor when the answer could be that their POLARITY COULD BE SWITCHED, much like reversing the cables on you car battery.

Green algae extract can boost the body's immune response to flu vaccine, says a Canadian study. Researchers from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Ocean Nutrition Canada found that taking a carbohydrate extract of green algae in pill form greatly boosted the immune response to the flu vaccine in people aged 50 to 55.

This is the first published human study to show how a derivative of food source algae improves the body's immune response to the influenza vaccine. The study appears in the current issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

BENEFITS OF SPIRULINA:

  • Stimulates immune system to destroy invading disease organisms and carcinogens.


  • Potentiates the immune system with its anti-tumor, anti-viral and interferon inducing effects.


  • Helps to sanitize the bowel by detoxifying the colon and promoting the growth of friendly bacteria.


  • Promotes tissue repair in wounds and burns and has anti-infectious properties.


  • Decreases cholesterol levels and helps to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.


  • Works as an anti-inflammatory, helping to reduce the inflammation characteristic of arthritis.


  • Provides superior nutritional support as one of nature's whole foods for anyone who is weakened by disease, alcohol or drug abuse.


  • Helps to balance RNA/DNA (nucleic acids)


  • Curbs the appetite and helps to stimulate the metabolism.


  • Works like an antioxidant in detoxifying the body of pollutants.

Spirulina grows naturally in Lake Chad and Lake Nakuru in Africa and in Lake Texcoco in Mexico. Spirulina is not actually a marine algae.

Spirulina is carefully cultivated in special water-farms in subtropical regions. Spirulina is farmed in Hawaii, California, Thailand, Taiwan, India, China and elsewhere. The farms are situated in subtropical areas around latitude 20.

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Research References for Spirulina:

- Thirty healthy men with high cholesterol, mild hypertension and hyperlipidemia showed lower serum cholesterol, triglyceride and LDL (undesirable fat) levels after eating spirulina for eight weeks.
These men did not change their diet, except adding spirulina. No adverse effects were noted. Group A consumed 4.2 grams daily for eight weeks.
Total serum cholesterol dropped a significant 4.5% within 4 weeks from 244 to 233. Group B consumed spirulina for four weeks, then stopped.
Serum cholesterol levels decreased, then returned to the initial level. Researchers concluded spirulina did lower serum cholesterol and was likely to have a favorable effect on alleviating heart disease since the arterioscelosis index improved.

- Effects of spirulina on plasma lipoprotein lipase activity in rats. by K. Iwata. 1990. Pub. in Journal Nutr. Sci. Vitaminol. 36:165-171. Japan.
The effects of spirulina on lipoprotein lipase activity and hepatic triglyceride lipase activity in post-heparin plasma were studied in fructose-induced hyperlipidemic rats.
Male Wistar rats aged 3 weeks old (body weight, 54g) were fed on the high-fructose diet (68%) or the high-fructose diets containing spirulina at the level of 5%, 10%, and 15%, respectively, for 4 weeks.
The dietary hyperlipidemia caused by the high-fructose diet was improved by spirulina feeding, accompanied by a significant increase in the lipoprotein lipase activity in post-heparin plasma.

- Effects of spirulina on hypercholesterolemia and fatty liver in rats. by T. Kato and K. Takemoto. 1984. Saitama Medical College. Pub. in Japan Nutr. Foods Assoc. Journal. 37:323. Japan.
Rats fed basal diets containing 1% cholesterol showed elevated total cholesterol, and phospholipids in serum.
This was clearly reduced by rats fed basal diets containing 16% spirulina and 1% cholesterol.
The results indicated spirulina may prevent dietary hypercholesterolemia and arterioscelerosis. Fatty liver caused by high fat and high-cholesterol diets was also reduced rapidly by feeding spirulina.

- Effects of spirulina on plasma lipoprotein lipase activity in rats. by K. Iwata, et al. 1990. Pub. in Journal Nutr. Sci. Vitaminol, 36:165-171. Japan.
The effects of spirulina on lipoprotein lipase activity and hepatic triglyceride lipase activity in post-heparin plasma were studied in fructose-induced hyperlipidemic rats.
Male Wistar rats aged 3 weeks old (body weight, 54g) were fed on the high-fructose diet (68%) or the high-fructose diets containing spirulina at the level of 5%, 10%, and 15%, respectively, for 4 weeks.
The dietary hyperlipidemia caused by the high-fructose diet was improved by spirulina feeding, accompanied by a significant increase in the lipoprotein lipase activity in post-heparin plasma.

1. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication by an aqueous extract of spirulina. by Ayehunie, Belay et al. 7th IAAA Conf., Knysna, South Africa. 1996. USA.
2. Calcium Spirulan, an inhibitor of enveloped virus replication, from a blue-green alga Spirulina. by Hayashi et al. 1996. Pub. in Journal of Natural Products, 59, 83-87. Japan.
3. An extract from spirulina is a selective inhibitor of herpes simplex virus Type 1. by Hayashi et al. 1993. Japan.
4. Antiviral activity of blue-green algae cultures. by Patterson. Pub. in Journal of Phycology 29, 125-130. USA.
5. AIDS Antiviral sulfolipids from cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). by K. Gustafson, et al. 1989. Pub. in Journal of the National Cancer Institute, August 16, 1989, pg 1254. USA.
6. Evaluation of chemoprevention of oral cancer with spirulina. by Babu, M. et al. 1995. Pub. in Nutrition and Cancer, Vol. 24, No. 2, 197-202. India.
7. Inhibitive effect and mechanism of polysaccharide of spirulina on transplanted tumor cells in mice. by Lisheng, et al. 1991. Pub. in Marine Sciences, Qingdao, N.5. pp 33-38. China.
8. Enhancement of endonuclease activity and repair DNA synthesis by polysaccharide of spirulina. by Qishen, P. et al. 1988. Pub. in Chinese Genetics Journal, 15 (5) 374-381. China.
9. Inhibition of experimental oral carcinogenesis by topical beta carotene. by Schwartz, et al. 1986. Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Pub. in Carcinogenesis, May 1986 7(5) 711-715. USA.
10. Prevention of experimental oral cancer by extracts of spirulina-dunaliella algae. by J. Schwartz, G. Shklar, et al. 1988. Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Pub. in Nutrition and Cancer, 11, 127-134. 1988. USA.
11. Bioavailability of spirulina carotenes in preschool children. by V. Annapurna, et al. 1991. National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India. J. Clin. Biochem Nutrition. 10 145-151. India.
12. Large scale nutritional supplementation with spirulina alga. by C.V. Seshadri. 1993. All India Coordinated Project on Spirulina. Shri Amm Murugappa Chettiar Research Center (MCRC) Madras, India.
13. Inhibition of experimental oral carcinogenesis by topical beta carotene. by Schwartz, et al. 1986. Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Pub. in Carcinogenesis, May 1986 7(5) 711-715. USA.
14. Prevention of experimental oral cancer by extracts of spirulina-dunaliella algae. by J. Schwartz, G. Shklar, et al. 1988. Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Pub. in Nutrition and Cancer, 11, 127-134. 1988. USA.
15. Cholesterol lowering effect of spirulina. by N. Nayaka, et al. 1988. Tokai Univ. Pub. in Nutrition Reports Int'l, Vol. 37, No. 6, 1329-1337. Japan.
16. Clinical and biochemical evaluations of spirulina with regard to its application in the treatment of obesity. by E.W. Becker, et al. 1986. Inst. Chem. Pfanz. Pub. in Nutrition Reports Int'l, Vol. 33, No. 4, pg 565. Germany.
17. Effects of spirulina on hypercholesterolemia and fatty liver in rats. by T. Kato and K. Takemoto. 1984. Saitama Medical College. Pub. in Japan Nutr. Foods Assoc. Journal. 37:323. Japan.
18. Effects of spirulina on plasma lipoprotein lipase activity in rats. by K. Iwata. 1990. Pub. in Journal Nutr. Sci. Vitaminol. 36:165-171. Japan.
19. Hypocholesterolemic effect of blue-green algae spirulina spirulina in albino rats. by M.A. Devi and L.V. Venkataraman. 1983. Pub. in Nutrition Reports Int'l, 28:519-530. India.
20. The effect of spirulina on reduction of serum cholesterol. by N. Nayaka, et al. 1986. Tokai Univ. Pub. in Progress in Medicine, Vol. 36, No. 11. Japan.
21. Effect of water soluble and water insoluble fractions of spirulina over serum lipids and glucose resistance of rats. by Y. Takai, et al. 1991. Pub. in J. Japan Soc. Nutr. Food Science, 44:273-277. Japan.
22. Effects of spirulina on plasma lipoprotein lipase activity in rats. by K. Iwata, et al. 1990. Pub. .in Journal Nutr. Sci. Vitaminol, 36:165-171. Japan.
23. Algoculture: Spirulina, hope for a hungry world. by Ripley D. Fox. 1986. Pub. by Edisud, Aix-en-Province, France (in French).
24. Current knowledge on potential health benefits of spirulina. by Amha Belay and Yoshimichi Ota. 1993. Pub. in Journal of Appl. Phycology, 5:235-241. USA.
25. Health Benefits of Spirulina. by Denise Fox. 1993. In Spirulina, Algae of Life. April 1993. Bulletin No. 12. Pub. by Institute Oceanographique, Monaco.
26. Large scale nutritional supplementation with spirulina alga. by C.V. Seshadri. 1993. All India Coordinated Project on Spirulina. Shri Amm Murugappa Chettiar Research Center (MCRC) Madras, India.
27. Microalgae as Food and Supplement by Robert A. Kay. 1991. In Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutr. 30(6):555-573. Pub. by CRC Press. USA.
28. Spirulina: a model for microalgae as human food. by Alan Jassby. 1988. In Algae and Human Affairs. edited by Lembi and Waaland. Pub. by Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, UK.
29. Spirulina, the edible organism. by Orio Ciferri. 1983. In Microbiological Reviews.Dec 1983. 551-578. Italy.
30. Antiviral activity of blue-green algae cultures. by Patterson. Pub. in Journal of Phycology 29, 125-130. USA.
31. AIDS Antiviral sulfolipids from cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). by K. Gustafson, et al. 1989. Pub. in Journal of the National Cancer Institute, August 16, 1989, pg 1254. USA.
32. Biotechnology & Utilization of Algae: The Indian Experience. by L.V. Venkataraman and E.W. Becker. 1985. Pub. by Sharada Press. Pg 114-115. Mangalore, India.
33. Glycolipids isolated from spirulina. by N. Kataoka, et al. 1983. Pub. in Agric. Biol. Chem. 47(10), 2349-2355. Japan.
34. Effects of polysaccharide and phycocyanin from spirulina on peripheral blood and hematopoietic system of bone marrow in mice. by Zhang Cheng-Wu, et al.. April 1994.
35. Nanjing Univ. China. Pub. in Proc. of Second Asia Pacific Conf. on Algal Biotech. Univ. of Malaysia. p.58. China.
36. Enhancement of antibody production in mice by dietary spirulina. by Hayashi, et al. June 1994. Kagawa Nutrition Univ. Japan. Pub. in Journal of Nutr. Science and Vitaminology. Japan.
37. Phagocytic potential of feline macrophages after exposure to a water soluble extract of spirulina in vitro. by M. Qureshi, et al. January 1996. Pub. in Immunopharmacology. in press. USA.
38. Spirulina extracts enhances chicken macrophage functions after in vitro exposure. by M. Qureshi, et al. 1995. Pub. in Jour. Nutritional Immunology, No. 3 (4) 35-45. USA.
39. Immune enhancement potential of spirulina in chickens. by M. Qureshi, et al. August 1994. Poultry Science Assoc. Dept. of Poultry Science, North Carolina State, NC. Pub. in Journal of Poultry Science Vol 73, S.1. p. 46. USA.
40. Immunomodulary effects of spirulina supplementation in chickens. by M. Qureshi, et al. May 1995. North Carolina State. Pub. in Proc. of 44th Western Poultry Disease Conference, pp 117-120. USA.
41. Immunostimulating activity of lipopolysaccharides from blue-green algae. by L. Besednova, et al. 1979. Pub. in Zhurnal Mikrobiologii, Epidemiologii, Immunobiologii, 56(12) pp 75-79. Russia.
42. Means to normalize the levels of immunoglobulin E, using the food supplement Spirulina. by L. Evets, et al. 1994. Grodenski State Medical Univ. Russian Federation Committee of Patents and Trade. Patent (19)RU (11)2005486. Jan. 15, 1994. Russia.
43. Radioprotective effect of extract from spirulina in mouse bone marrow cells studied by using the micronucleus test. by P. Qishen, Kolman et al. 1989. In Toxicology Letters 48: 165-169. China.
44. Study on effect and mechanism of polysaccharides of spirulina on body immune function improvement. by G. Baojiang, et al. April 1994. South China Normal Univ. China. Pub. in Proc. of Second Asia Pacific Conf. on Algal Biotech. Univ. of Malaysia. pp 33-38. China.
45. Immune response activation in channel catfish ictaluras punctatus fed spirulina enriched artemia. by B. Portoni et al. 1996. American Fisheries Society Fish Health Section. USA.
46. Availability of iron to rats from spirulina, a blue-green algae. by P. Johnson and E. Shubert. 1986. Pub. in Nutrition Research Vol 6, 85-94. USA.
47. Clinical experiences of administration of spirulina to patients with hypochronic anemia. by T. Takeuchi, et al. 1978. Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. Japan.
48. Iron transfer from spirulina to blood in rats. by K. Takemoto, et al. 1982. Saitama Medical College. Japan.
49. Effect of spirulina on the renal toxicity induced by inorganic mercury and cisplatin. by H. Fukino, et al. 1990. Pub. in Eisei Kagaku, 36:5, 1990. Japan.
50. The effect of spirulina on nephrotoxicity in rats. by Y. Yamane, et al. 1988. Chiba Univ. Presented at Annual Symposium of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan, April 15, 1988. Japan.
51. Effects of spirulina on caecum content in rats. by Y. Tokai, et al. 1987. Chiba Hygiene College Bulletin. Feb. 1987 Vol. 5, No. 2. Japan.
52. Algoculture: Spirulina, hope for a hungry world. by Ripley D. Fox. 1986. Pub. by Edisud, Aix-en-Province, France (in French).
53. Clinical experimentation with spirulina. by R. Ramos Galvan. 1973. National Institute of Nutrition, Mexico City, Mexico (in Spanish).
54. Current knowledge on potential health benefits of spirulina. by Amha Belay and Yoshimichi Ota. 1993. In Journal of Appl. Phycology, 5:235-241. USA.
55. Effectiveness of spirulina algae as food for children with protein-energy malnutrition in a tropical environment. by P. Bucaille. 1990. University Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France. Oct. 1990. Zaire. (in French).
56. Food value of spirulina in humans. by C. Sautier and J. Tremolieres. 1976. Pub. in Ann. Nutrition Alim., 30:517-534. France (in French).
57. Observations on the utilization of spirulina as an adjuvant nutritive factor in treating some diseases accompanied by a nutritional deficiency. by V. Fica, et al. 1984. Clinica II Medicala, Spitalui Clinic, Bucuresti. Med. Interna 36 (3). Romania. (in Romanian).
58. Spirulina in Jiangxi China. by Miao Jian Ren. 1987. Academy of Agricultural Science. Presented at Soc. Appl. Algology, Lille France Sep. 1987. China.
59. The study on curative effect of zinc containing spirulina for zinc deficient children. by Wen Yonghuang, et al. 1994. Capital Medical College, Beijing. Presented at 5th Int'l Phycological Congress, Qingdao, June 1994. China.
60. Antitumoral agents containing phycobilin- also used to treat ulcers and hemorrhoidal bleeding. by Dainippon Ink & Chemicals and Tokyo Kenkyukai. 1983. Patent 58065216 A 830418. Japan.
61. Effect of spirulina on the renal toxicity induced by inorganic mercury and cisplatin. by H. Fukino, et al. 1990. Pub. in Eisei Kagaku, 36:5, 1990. Japan.
62. Effects of polysaccharide and phycocyanin from spirulina on peripheral blood and hematopoietic system of bone marrow in mice. by Zhang Cheng-Wu, et al.. April 1994. Nanjing Univ. China. Pub. in Proc. of Second Asia Pacific Conf. on Algal Biotech. Univ. of Malaysia. China.
63. Calcium Spirulan, an inhibitor of enveloped virus replication, from a blue-green alga Spirulina. by Hayashi et al. 1996. Pub. in Journal of Natural Products, 59, 83-87. Japan.
64. An extract from spirulina is a selective inhibitor of herpes simples virus Type 1. by Hayashi et al. 1993. Japan.
65. Effects of polysaccharide and phycocyanin from spirulina on peripheral blood and hematopoietic system of bone marrow in mice. by Zhang Cheng-Wu, et al.. April 1994. Nanjing Univ. China. Pub. in Proc. of Second Asia Pacific Conf. on Algal Biotech. Univ. of Malaysia. p.58. China.
66. Enhancement of antibody production in mice by dietary spirulina. by Hayashi, et al. June 1994. Kagawa Nutrition Univ. Japan. Pub. in Journal of Nutr. Science and Vitaminology. Japan.
67. Immune enhancement potential of spirulina in chickens. by M. Quereshi, et al. August 1994. Poultry Science Assoc. Dept. of Poultry Science, North Carolina State, NC. Pub. in Journal of Poultry Science Vol 73, S.1. p. 46. USA.
68. Immunomodulary effects of spirulina supplementation in chickens. by M. Qureshi, et al. May 1995. North Carolina State. Pub. in Proc. of 44th Western Poultry Disease Conference, pp 117-120. USA.
69. Immunostimulating activity of lipopolysaccharides from blue-green algae. by L. Besednova, et al. 1979. Pub. in Zhurnal Mikrobiologii, Epidemiologii, Immunobiologii, 56(12) pp 75-79. Russia.
70. Inhibitive effect and mechanism of polysaccharide of spirulina on transplanted tumor cells in mice. by Lisheng, et al. 1991.Pub. in Marine Sciences, Qingdao, N.5. pp 33-38. China.
71. Radioprotective effect of extract from spirulina in mouse bone marrow cells studied by using the micronucleus test. by P. Qishen, Kolman et al. 1989. In Toxicology Letters 48: 165-169. China.
72. Study on effect and mechanism of polysaccharides of spirulina on body immune function improvement. by G. Baojiang, et al. April 1994. South China Normal Univ. China. Pub. in Proc. of Second Asia Pacific Conf. on Algal Biotech. Univ. of Malaysia. pp 33-38. China.
73. Enhancement of endonuclease activity and repair DNA synthesis by polysaccharide of spirulina. by Qishen, P. et al. 1988. Pub. in Chinese Genetics Journal, 15 (5) 374-381. China.


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